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Siegfried Sassoon War Poems

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[Alan Seeger] [Charles Hamilton Sorley] [Edward Thomas] [Herbert Read] [Isaac Rosenberg] [John McCrae] [Rupert Brooke] [Siegfried Sassoon] [Wilfred Owen] [William Noel Hodgson]

Siegfried Loraine Sassoon, CBE, MC (1886 – 1967)


wwi war poemssiegfried sassoon war poem collectionSassoon was born in Matfield, Kent to a Jewish father and Protestant mother. He dropped out of University after a couple of years studying law and history, and spent his time, hunting, playing cricket and privately publishing some of his own poetry.


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War Poems by Siegfried Sassoon

siegfried sassoon, war poet, poemsSassoon was born in Matfield, Kent to a Jewish father and Protestant mother. He dropped out of University after a couple of years studying law and history, and spent his time, hunting, playing cricket and privately publishing some of his own poetry.

When he joined the military in 1914 (with the Sussex Yeomanry), he managed to break his arm whilst riding and had to remain in England. Whilst healing, his younger brother was killed at Gallipoli which hit Siegfried very hard. Later, in November 1915, Siegfried was sent to First Battalion in France becoming close friends with Robert Graves.

During his course of duty he single handedly captured a German trench in the Hindenburg Line, and often went out on night-raids and bombing patrols, which earned him the nickname ‘Mad Jack’, although his perceived bravery was driven by a manic courage and suicidal exploits. At the end of his convalescent leave, he threw his Military Cross into the river Mersey, and declined to return to duty. Encouraged by such friends as Bertrand Russell, he sent a letter to his commanding officer entitled, ‘A Soldier’s Declaration’.

Sassoon was fortunately not court-martialed over his declination to return to duty, instead the authorities declared he was unfit for service and sent him to a hospital in Edinburgh where he was treated for shell shock. It was here he met Wilfred Owen. A manuscript of Owen’sAnthem for Doomed Youth’ contains Sassoon’s handwritten amendments.

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Banque de Paris, war poster, photo, wwi, wwii
Banque de Paris


Banque de Paris, war poster, photo, wwi, wwii
Banque de Paris


Gas Masks, war poster, photo, wwi, wwii
Gas Masks


Women's Land Army, war poster, photo, wwi, wwii
Women's Land Army


Honneur Patrie, war poster, photo, wwi, wwii
Honneur Patrie


Rally Round Flag, war poster, photo, wwi, wwii
Rally Round Flag


M-3 tank and crew, war poster, photo, wwi, wwii
M-3 tank and crew